Playing with Facebook Stories Camera Effects

Playing with Facebook Stories Camera Effects

My Facebook friends must be thinking I'm nuts (again).  I've been tinkering with Facebook Stories and its Camera Effects.  In fact, I've been playing so much I'm also looking into the Camera Effects and AR (augmented reality) developer group.

First, here's some of the images that I've been creating.  Here are some public images that I was playing with while in Portland at the World Domination Summit.

Changing Camera Effects

I took both of these pictures -- the same picture with Camera Effects -- while at Directors Park in Portland, OR.  The original picture was a slightly out of focus shot of three young girls playing.  I was sitting near their parents, who were so happy that the girls were enjoying themselves in the water (so the moms could enjoy and talk).  I took the photo, as I was entranced by their joy of play, and then shared it with the moms.  They were so happy with the versions of it that they wanted them emailed back to them.  I also shared it with the girls, who wanted more.  MORE!

Here's how these were altered with Facebook Story Camera Effect.

  • I took the picture from within Facebook, from Stories on my Moto Z Play Android.
  • I then could either swipe through filters and overlays, or click the Effects icon, which is a magic wand.
  • I could select from options then that included things that looked like hot air balloons, which were combinations of filters that changed the nature of the image blocks, letting me create painting-like effects.

Since then, Facebook seemed to get rid of the balloons, and have expanded things that look like spheres.  Each seems to do a different thing.  I also can take photos with a Camera Effect on, and then can add a second Camera Effect with the Effects icon as well.

Here are many of my crazy examples:

Gandalf Plus

This one used the Gandalf-like AR addon, and then playing with the different spheres after the photo was taken.

This was the "first" Camera Effect layer, for comparison.

Comparing Effects - Me and Tree


This was two different filters from the same photo in Portland of me under a tree.

My start - LAX Morning


This was the picture that started it earlier for me, taken at LAX on my way to Portland.

Outdoor Images -- Getting the Hang of it


Here's one I took in Portland, the "wrong way" as a Landscape view.


These were taken in that same park, using just one Camera Effect each.

Simple Morning Shot


This was a simple view from my backyard writing retreat, with one of the spheres.

Down the Rabbit Hole - Playing with Layered Effects


These images above were a morph of a tired me with an overlay plus filters.  The grey is me, not a filter.

 


Above, here's just playful me with overlays with no or minimal filters.

CPAP and darkness effect


Yes, I wear a CPAP machine and this is from a nearly dark photo, originally taken with a light red Camera Effect . . . and all the expansions of it with different Camera Effects as a second layer.

 

Using staggered shots


This was a series taken at an outdoor cafe last night.  The main effect took a staggered picture, and the differences are the second layers.

Using background and patterns


I really enjoy this series, also taken at the outdoor cafe.


Interestingly, I think this was the original.

My favorite Facebook Camera Effect


One of my favorite filters is one that seems to be like a roving watercolor.  Depending on when you click the "shutter," it captures a different mix of colors and splotches.

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Craft, Process, and Thinking of Becoming

Craft, Process, and Thinking of Becoming

Today I’m working on taxes for our two college students’ FAFSAs and watching “Abstract: The Art of Design” on Netflix in the background.  Christoph Niemann is both in his story and telling his story about craft and life.  He is a character and an animated person with his character . . . and a voice.

Two of his statements struck me about the work I’m doing now on career and vocation exploration.

First: “Creating a process to do it allows you to do unembarrassing stuff on command is the only way you can survive . . . if you create an armor of craft around you.”  This makes sense from other work on creativity and boundary-setting.  We often can do better regular, daily work in creative spaces if we set hard edges around the work and create routine.  Having the skills and letting them work in focused settings then lets creative work have a place to build.

Yet Second:  “The one thing that is dangerous about working on your craft and the world around you is that it can keep you from asking the really valid questions . . . what is the real thing I’m trying to get good at?”

Intriguing question.  It isn’t “what am I good at?”  It is a sense of becoming in terms of craft, in terms of skills.  What stands in my way to “trying to get good at” something?  Fear?  Practice?  Focus?  Direction?
***
I just went to a friend’s 55th birthday party last night, and we told stories of how old we were from when we all met decades ago.  Travel and children were our benchmarks in the time road.  “How are things?”  “Great — I’m planning a trip to South Korea.”  Is how we are doing a postcard or Facebook post about the event-based measures?
The party was at an improv club, which added an oddly critical narrative layer to our gathering.  They quizzed the birthday girl about her daily life and then created an exaggerated parody of her life as a humorous struggle with time and interaction with others.  It broke away pieces of an interaction and circular time life.
None of us in our stories of the evening told stories of Becoming.
***
Two nights ago I had the honor of talking about the social impact of technology on music with a private group in Century City.  People stayed for hours, talking about our shared Becoming through streaming music’s transformation.  We talked about the Becoming from our work in the world — and continuing the conversation afterwards.
***
How do we talk about Becoming with others?  With ourselves?  Can we get caught up in so many of our busy metrics with time in a busy personal framing that we (and I) lose track of our shared Becoming stories?